Stop Bad Road Privatization

CALLING OUT BAD DEALS—Texas’ roadways should be operated for the long-term public interest. As Texas officials continue pushing risky road privatization deals, TexPIRG is leading the effort to protect the public interest.

Protecting Texans from bad Deals

Texas has been struggling to plug ever-widening holes in the state’s transportation budget while also working to meet growing demand for improved transportation infrastructure and repair. Enter global private infrastructure companies and the investment banks that back them. Touting the benefits of public-private partnerships, these companies seek deals for privatized roads on which they would charge and collect escalating tolls on motorists for decades to come.

Many Texans are skeptical of road privatization and state officials should approach the deals with great caution. While road privatization offers a hard-to-resist “quick fix” for state budget and transportation challenges, the deals are often short-term budget gimmicks that place the public interest in jeopardy.

PUBLIC INTEREST PRINCIPLES

Should Texas move forward with any future road building projects that use private investment, state officials must insist on specific protections for the public to ensure that the needs of people come before any other special interest or investment entity. TexPIRG is pressing public officials to uphold six basic principles to protect the public interest:

  1. Retain public control over transportation planning and management.
  2. Ensure that the public receives fair long-term value for assets. Just because a state or locality faces dire fiscal straits, they shouldn’t sell public assets at a discount.
  3. No deals longer than 30 years should be made because lawmakers cannot reasonably anticipate our transportation needs or assess the value of toll roads beyond a few decades.
  4. Require state-of-the-art safety and maintenance standards that will increase over time.
  5. Complete transparency and accountability must be maintained so that the public knows the complete terms of specific proposed deals — and lawmakers must vote on them.
  6. No budget gimmicks. If governments do sign these deals, the money must be used to address other long-term transportation needs.

TexPIRG will continue to build public opposition, apply public pressure, mobilize coalitions of stakeholders, and educate public officials until Texas’ roadways are safe from bad road privatization deals.

Issue updates

Blog Post | Consumer Protection

As House Holds Oversight Hearing, 340 Groups Call For Defense of CFPB | Ed Mierzwinski

Today, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray will present the CFPB's sixth semi-annual report to the House Financial Services Committee, whose majority members have been harsh critics of the successful consumer agency. Americans for Financial Reform, joined by the state PIRGs and a total of 340 national, state and local groups, sent Congress a letter explaining why the idea of the CFPB needs no defense, only more defenders.

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG | Consumer Protection

FCC NET NEUTRALITY ORDER PROTECTS THE OPEN INTERNET

Today the FCC took not one but two critical actions to make sure that the Internet works for everybody. First, it issued a "Net Neutrality" order guaranteeing a free and open Internet. This Internet freedom order will prevent the phone and cable companies from granting fast lanes or other preferences to already powerful firms. The FCC also acted to override state laws that prevented local governments from building out broadband networks to compete with the phone and cable companies.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

The Innovative Transportation Index

This report reviews the availability of 11 technology-enabled transportation services – including online ridesourcing, carsharing, ridesharing, taxi hailing, static and real-time transit information, multi-modal apps, and virtual transit ticketing – in 70 U.S. cities. It finds that residents of 19 cities, with a combined population of nearly 28 million people, have access to eight or more of these services, with other cities catching up rapidly.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Trouble in Toyland 2014

Among the toys surveyed this year, we found numerous choking hazards and five toys with concentrations of toxics exceeding federal standards. In addition to reporting on potentially hazardous products found in stores in 2014, this installment of the report describes the potential hazards in toys and children’s products.

> Keep Reading

Pages

News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Report Shows Texas cities Driving Less, Using Transit and Alternatives More

A first-of-its-kind report by TexPIRG Education Fund shows reduced driving miles and rates of car commuting in Texas’s urbanized areas—including Austin, San Antonio and Houston—and greater use of public transit and biking.

> Keep Reading

Forum: Why reward polluters with tax credits?

Three years ago, when oil was still spurting into the Gulf and BP was touting the billions of dollars it set aside for claims and the cleanup, the oil giant was also preparing to deduct the price of the disaster as an “ordinary and necessary” cost of doing business.

BP managed to write off the cost of its $32 billion cleanup and collect a $10 billion federal tax windfall for the spill.

> Keep Reading

Private Loans, Public Complaints

The current debt on private student loans in the United States is estimated at $165 billion. Here in Texas student borrowers carry an average of $22,000 in debt. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is collecting complaints on those private student loans.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG | Consumer Protection

Survey Finds Dangerous Toys on Store Shelves

Dangerous or toxic toys can still be found on America’s store shelves, according to Texas Public Interest Research Group’s 27th annual Trouble in Toyland report.

> Keep Reading
News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Budget, Food

Ag Subsidies Pay for 21 Twinkies per Taxpayer, But Only Half of an Apple Apiece

Federal subsidies for commodity crops are subsidizing junk food additives like high fructose corn syrup, enough to pay for 21 Twinkies per taxpayer every year, according to TexPIRG’s new report, Apples to Twinkies 2012. Meanwhile, limited subsidies for fresh fruits and vegetables would buy one half of an apple per taxpayer.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Highway Boondoggles

Even though the Driving Boom is now over, state and federal governments continue to pour vast sums of money into the construction of new highways and expansion of old ones – at the expense of urgent needs such as road and bridge repairs, improvements in public transportation and other transportation priorities. Eleven proposed highway projects across the country – slated to cost at least $13 billion – exemplify the need for a fresh approach to transportation spending.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Budget

Offshore Shell Games

Many large U.S.-based multinational corporations avoid paying U.S. taxes by using accounting tricks to make profits made in America appear to be generated in offshore tax havens—countries with minimal or no taxes. By booking profits to subsidiaries registered in tax havens, multinational corporations are able to avoid an estimated $90 billion in federal income taxes each year. These subsidiaries are often shell companies with few, if any employees, and which engage in little to no real business activity.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

The Unfriendly Skies

It seems as if every consumer has an airline problem story—how they were trapped on the tarmac, tricked by fees, missed their connection, or lost their bag. What many consumers don’t know is that they have a number of new rights as well as a right to complain, both to the airline and to the government. This report tracks five years of consumer complaints and highlights which airlines received the most complaints and what kinds of complaints were most common.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Debt Collectors, Debt Complaints

This is the fifth in a series of reports that review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state level. In this report we explore consumer complaints about debt collection, with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with debt collectors and documenting the role of the CFPB in helping consumers successfully resolve their complaints.

> Keep Reading
Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Course

Universities and colleges across the country are taking steps to encourage their communities, students, faculty and staff to decrease their reliance on personal vehicles. These efforts are working well – saving money for universities, improving the quality of life in college towns, and giving today’s students experience in living life without depending on a personal car.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up to date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates, and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code

Support Us

Your donation supports TexPIRG's work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.