Stop Bad Road Privatization

CALLING OUT BAD DEALS—Texas’ roadways should be operated for the long-term public interest. As Texas officials continue pushing risky road privatization deals, TexPIRG is leading the effort to protect the public interest.

Protecting Texans from bad Deals

Texas has been struggling to plug ever-widening holes in the state’s transportation budget while also working to meet growing demand for improved transportation infrastructure and repair. Enter global private infrastructure companies and the investment banks that back them. Touting the benefits of public-private partnerships, these companies seek deals for privatized roads on which they would charge and collect escalating tolls on motorists for decades to come.

Many Texans are skeptical of road privatization and state officials should approach the deals with great caution. While road privatization offers a hard-to-resist “quick fix” for state budget and transportation challenges, the deals are often short-term budget gimmicks that place the public interest in jeopardy.

PUBLIC INTEREST PRINCIPLES

Should Texas move forward with any future road building projects that use private investment, state officials must insist on specific protections for the public to ensure that the needs of people come before any other special interest or investment entity. TexPIRG is pressing public officials to uphold six basic principles to protect the public interest:

  1. Retain public control over transportation planning and management.
  2. Ensure that the public receives fair long-term value for assets. Just because a state or locality faces dire fiscal straits, they shouldn’t sell public assets at a discount.
  3. No deals longer than 30 years should be made because lawmakers cannot reasonably anticipate our transportation needs or assess the value of toll roads beyond a few decades.
  4. Require state-of-the-art safety and maintenance standards that will increase over time.
  5. Complete transparency and accountability must be maintained so that the public knows the complete terms of specific proposed deals — and lawmakers must vote on them.
  6. No budget gimmicks. If governments do sign these deals, the money must be used to address other long-term transportation needs.

TexPIRG will continue to build public opposition, apply public pressure, mobilize coalitions of stakeholders, and educate public officials until Texas’ roadways are safe from bad road privatization deals.

Issue updates

Report | TexPIRG | Budget, Financial Reform, Tax

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News Release | TexPIRG | Consumer Protection

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Trouble in Toyland 2012

The 2012 Trouble in Toyland report is the 27th annual TexPIRG survey of toy safety. In this report, TexPIRG provides safety guidelines for consumers when purchasing toys for small children and provides examples of toys currently on store shelves that may pose potential safety hazards.

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News Release | TexPIRG Education Fund | Budget, Food

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Budget, Food

Apples to Twinkies 2012

In this report, we find that in 2011, over $1.28 billion in taxpayer subsidies went to junk food ingredients, bringing the total to a staggering $18.2 billion since 1995. To put that figure in perspective, $18.2 billion is enough to buy 2.9 billion Twinkies every year - 21 for every single American taxpayer.

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News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Report Examines Whether High-Speed Rail Should Be Public, Private or Both

A first-of-its-kind report released today examines whether high-speed rail should be public, private or both. The research report released by TexPIRG examines the experience with public-private partnerships for high-speed rail in other countries.  In addition to outlining the promises and pitfalls, the report recommends ten principles to protect taxpayers and the public under private financing deals.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Fort Worth Weekly: Fire Sale

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News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

New Report: Texas’ Seniors Will Face Poor Mobility Options

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News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Texas’ misplaced priorities: $350 million subsidy to private toll road benefiting ExxonMobil

As the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) hosts its final public hearings on its Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), a broad coalition of groups including Texans Uniting for Reform and Freedom (TURF), Citizens Transportation Coalition, Texas Public Interest Research Group (TexPIRG), Independent Texans, Central Texas Republican Liberty Caucus, Texans for Accountable Government, Houston Tomorrow, and Sierra Club are protesting the agency’s misplaced priorities. TxDOT officials have made the Grand Parkway Segment E a statewide "priority" and are assigning $350 million of statewide discretionary funds toward the project.

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News Release | TexPIRG | Transportation

Lawmakers act hypocritically as they try to silence members and cut off debate

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Transportation and the New Generation

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Report | TexPIRG Education Fund | Budget

Following the Money 2012

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Report | TexPIRG | Consumer Protection

Trouble in Toyland

The 2011 Trouble in Toyland report is our 26th annual survey of toy safety. In this report, we provide safety guidelines for consumers when purchasing toys for young children and provide examples of toys currently on store shelves that may pose potential safety hazards.

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Report | TexPIRG | Transportation

Caution: Red Light Cameras Ahead

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Report | TexPIRG | Transportation

High-Speed Rail: Public Private or Both?

Private sector companies are likely to play a major role in the construction of high-speed rail lines in the United States. Public-private partnerships – or “PPPs” – have come to play an important role in the construction of high-speed rail lines around the world.

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Bad Privatization

Tell Gov. Perry to look out for his constituents and not his corporate backers — no more private toll roads!

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